RSS

Monthly Archives: October 2014

Father’s Achievement

I watched some emotional videos the other day; and they made me think, what can I do to make my life more meaningful, influential, … memorable? I considered what I have done and what I could do to make my effect on those around me more valuable. And, maybe more importantly, how that effect can be measured or recognized; how can I determine if I did lead my life in the greatest way possible? I began to perceive what I want from my life. I recognized criteria that will reveal the effectiveness my life or anyone’s life.

I came to this conclusion: My life’s accomplishment will be the greatest I could possibly want, if after I am gone, I am missed. That’s it; being missed. After I’m gone, if those that I love notice I am not here, then I have done good. At that moment, my legacy will be realized. I began reflecting on events and interactions in my life. I wondered if those moments would be remembered as I remembered them. I wondered if each of those “learn from me” instances would be valuable. I wondered if my presence would be missed by the ones I love.

In that reflection on who I am, in who I have become, in my achievements, in my transgressions, in my reached and missed goals, in all the life I enjoyed, in all the love I have shared, in the lessons I learned and taught; it was observing those moments that I realized how meaningful, influential, memorable, and great my Dad’s life was.

Dad, you are missed.

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 26, 2014 in Memories, Writing

 

The Secret Casualties of Iraq’s Abandoned Chemical Weapons

This is a long article, eight parts. I am sharing this public, because it is important that it gets shared. Our government, for the past 15 years or more, has placed our soldiers in harms way, and has ignored their needs. This article describes the chemical weapons our servicemen are exposed to, and then how our government ignored them. These chemical weapons are now controlled by the “Islamic State”.

The Secret Casualties of Iraq’s Abandoned Chemical Weapons

 
1 Comment

Posted by on October 15, 2014 in Politics

 

Sustainability Brief Overview of Solar Utilization Network

Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship: Solar Utilization Network (IGERT-SUN)

The IGERT-SUN program is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. The faculty includes: Willem (Wim) Vermaas, DSc, Program Director; Cesar I. Torres, PhD; Jenefer Husman, PhD; David Guston, PhD; and, Ana Moore, PhD. A key goal of the program is to enlist PhD students from a wide range of disciplines to examine how to advance solar energy science and usage, focusing on three approaches: photovoltaics, solar thermal, and photosynthesis driven bioenergy. IGERT-SUN is designed to seek transitioning our current fossil-fuel based economy to these various forms of solar energy. The variety of participants includes students pursuing doctorates in Engineering, Biochemistry, Environmental Engineering, and Sustainability Engineering; one member is identified as “Human and Social Dimensions of Science and Technology” doctoral student.

The IGERT-SUN project highlights video on Vimeo demonstrates the faculty’s and the students’ vigor in pursuit of advancing these alternate energy resources. Miles Brungage, a student in the program, described how he appreciates the opportunity to work with colleagues of different studies but working a similar goal, sustainability. And Joseph Laureanti highlighted how this program offers him the opportunity to connect with people within alternative energies fields, and glean from them real purpose in the program. In some abstracts, I read a program focus on attracting “underrepresented groups, particularly Hispanics and Native American” candidates to the program. Although an admirable goal, if carried to excess, the achievement of that goal may result in reducing the diversity of the participants, or even narrowing the breadth of knowledge the program sought to nurture.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 5, 2014 in Class Writing, Sustainability

 

Tags: , ,